Chevy C10 Truck Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just saw a 1969 Chevrolet C30 "Longhorn" for sale. Does anyone know why it's called a "Longhorn"??

Dave
bowtieb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,754 Posts
This page is dedicated to the limited run of the Chevrolet Longhorn pick-up, and other rare Chevy and G.M.C. trucks trucks.
The Longhorn was produced from March 11th of '68 until the end of that generation, in '72. It was only available in 3/4 ton and 1 ton versions. The main thing that makes it a Longhorn, is the frame, and front of the bed are extended by six inches, making the wheelbase 133 inches, up from 127, and the bed now measures 8 1/2 feet long.
The easiest way to I.D. one, assuming the badges are missing, is to look at the front of the bed. G.M. didn't spend a whole lot of time or money on these, and if you look at the sides of these trucks, you'll see a body line where they added to the existing long bed. Also, there is a 'Longhorn' emblem on the bed sides. On the '68, it's located over the rear side marker light, while all the later models have it located directly in front of the side marker. All Longhorn trucks should have a wooden floor in the bed, and seven, or eight leaf, leaf springs in the back, as opposed to the weaker coils found on most trucks in this time frame. Naturally, the best way to tell if you're dealing with a Longhorn, is by the model number. For the 3/4 ton, a six cylinder will be a CS21034, while the V-8 trucks should be CE21034. If you're dealing with a one ton truck, the six cylinder will be CS31034, and CE31034 for the V-8 trucks. G.M.C. also had there version, but I can't seem to find much information on them.
I purchased mine in central Texas, and after I got it running, many Texans thought it was a local option package. (Ford has done this in recent history) However, regardless of what the Texans think, it was offered outside of The Lone Star State.
This extra long truck, was aimed at the booming camper industry, and was capable of hauling the largest camper on the market at the time. Although, with the extra cargo room, you can understand why so many were put to work.
The main thing that I like about it, is the looks and comments I get all the time and in traffic.
The '67-'72 trucks are more popular than ever, and the Longhorn is a model that has been all but forgotten in the collectors market, however, I have noticed quite a few in the past couple years that have been creeping into the market, and demanding quite a hefty price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
183 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
We must have been reading at same time
How you been Dave
Good Charlie, but lazy! Haven't worked on the 57 since the beginning of December. Work has been steady with some weekends off, but haven't been out to the shop much. I saw this truck for sale and asked the owner if he's interested in a trade. I sent him some pictures of the Camaro and he's interested, we've been emailing back and forth since yesterday. We'll see what happens. All good with you? How's the back? Projects coming along?

Dave
bowtieb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,754 Posts
Back is great. Actually getting things done on Chris' 57. Hope to have it out by spring. I'd bet I could build 3 C10s for the price of 1 57 wagon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I have a 1970 C/30 mine has a 9 foot step side body well its rough now but there. There is no added section in it. I had just wrote a thread asking how many may have been made. I think wrote in the new members section. Anyway have a good one and keep smilin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Longhorn

I have three 69 Longhorns. Two small block, four speeds and one 396 automatic. They are for sale if anyone is interested. They built 3,331 total, in 69 and only 600 BBC. Email; [email protected] if you have interest.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top